Hidden Indicators of Reef Health: New study suggests that common survey metrics may miss subtler signs of stress (cross-posted from Reefbites)

Some corals in the Gulf of Aqaba (also known as the Gulf of Eilat) in the Red Sea are spawning out of sync, says a new paper published in Science by scientists Tom Shlesinger and Yossi Loya from Tel-Aviv University.

Advertisements

New publication: The relationship between macroalgae taxa and human disturbance on central Pacific coral reefs

I am delighted to share my first first-authored peer reviewed journal article, The relationship between macroalgae taxa and human disturbance on central Pacific coral reefs, now out in Marine Pollution Bulletin!

How corals can help us make predictions about our future under climate change (cross-posted from ReefBites)

This blog post originally appeared on ReefBites, the student blog of the International Society for Reef Studies. Every two to seven years, the eastern equatorial Pacific climate oscillates between anomalously warm (El Niño) and cold (La Niña) conditions in a process known as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). This process influences sea surface temperatures … Continue reading How corals can help us make predictions about our future under climate change (cross-posted from ReefBites)

“We are not drowning, we are fighting”: Pacific Islanders want you to know that they still have hope for their islands

This blog post originally appeared on the Ocean Leaders blog, which highlights the work of Ocean Leaders fellows. Please consider giving them a follow on social media at @oceanleaders on Twitter or OceanLeadersUBC on Facebook! This past weekend, I was on a discussion panel for the documentary film Anote’s Ark, which follows the former present of … Continue reading “We are not drowning, we are fighting”: Pacific Islanders want you to know that they still have hope for their islands

Tiabo for now, Kiribati

I’m currently sitting in the departure terminal in Tarawa, the capital of Kiribati. It is a small room made of mismatched wood paneling, with one wall open to the tarmac, and a concrete floor. There are no lights, and a huge fan in the corner keeps the air moving, although it's still sweltering. My back … Continue reading Tiabo for now, Kiribati

Corals are smelly and other anecdotes from the field

There are so many things to love about fieldwork. As scientists, it's an opportunity to finally get our hands dirty (so to speak) and interact with the systems we're studying. It's also invaluable to get to know the communities and people who live in the places we work (scientists commonly treat people as separate from … Continue reading Corals are smelly and other anecdotes from the field

Getting to know Tarawa

It was exciting to finally step foot in Tarawa, the capital of the Republic of Kiribati, after hearing about it for so long -- my advisor has worked here for a decade or so, and I've spent my last three years as his student hearing about his work and its accompanying adventures. I've also spoken … Continue reading Getting to know Tarawa

Counting down to fieldwork in the Gilbert Islands

In just over a month, I'll be boarding a plane and heading to Tarawa, an atoll in the Gilbert Islands of Kiribati. I'll be staying in Tarawa and the nearby Abaiang Atoll for about a month to conduct the first stage of my Ph.D. fieldwork. It's been a long, dark, rainy winter in Vancouver and … Continue reading Counting down to fieldwork in the Gilbert Islands